SFP

sfp-5-115-for-web

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  • Perlite

    No. I won’t feel bad for him. Not for all of the glued-together Looney Tune mugs in the world… I am such a sap. Why did you have to be such a jerk, Pat? ;_;

    • Ben

      Nor will I, but I will feel bad for Allison, since she took things one step further than she wanted to and will be suffering guilt for a while.

    • Balthazar

      I feel bad for the mug, personally. All it wanted was to house tea and hot chocolate in it, now it may never get that chance.

    • Potatamoto

      I’d say I feel pity for him, but not sympathy. Pity just means I feel bad for the guy, Sympathy implies a more empathetic sadness, like I didn’t feel he got what was coming to him.

      I definitely feel worse for Allison…and way worse for the mug.

      • Travis Staggs

        I feel both. We have no way of knowing what he truly goes through on a day to day basis. It’s okay to feel sympathy for the devil, because they have bad days, too. In some cases, really bad days.

        I think the gift is somewhat ironic. ‘Blinded by his own feelings’ indeed.

        • Potatamoto

          I suppose lack of empathy isn’t exactly what I was going for. Nobody’s perfect, everyone makes mistakes, etc. etc. Gods only know what I’d do if I had telepathic powers. Still, that was a nasty, nasty thing he just did. So while I do genuinely feel sorry for him, I still think he got what he deserved. That’s really what I meant by the difference between pity and sympathy.

      • Markus

        I definitely empathize with him. Anyone good at talking who’s ever known someone well has had the opportunity to be hurtful in the way Pat was, and most of them have lived to regret it.

    • Ian Osmond

      I think you can empathize with somebody without thinking that what they did was okay.

      I empathize with both of them. That doesn’t mean I think either of them acted well. (Although I consider Patrick to have been worse. I mean, he is literally superhumanly good at pushing people’s buttons.)

      • Perlite

        But unless he had done this to help her in some roundabout, twisted way, I can’t on good conscious pity or empathize with him.
        Maybe that’s just my own hangups.

        • Ian Osmond

          I don’t consider empathy to have an ethical judgement component. It is possible to, with aptitude and training, empathize with the most vile people who have ever existed, without minimizing their vile-ness or accepting their actions. Pity, too. I can empathize with and pity a person while believing that their actions were wrong and that they should be punished for them.

          Empathy and pity help you find whatever mitigating factors exist, but you don’t have to make up mitigating factors that don’t exist…

      • Sabriel

        I agree with your first point. I can and do empathize with him.

        I don’t know about your second point. I mean, Alison is superhumanly good at throwing things.

        I’m more angry with Patrick right now just because I’m less clear on his motives, but I don’t think that Patrick necessarily acted worse. She really should not have done that and she is lucky that he is (evidently) not seriously injured.

  • Sabriel

    I wondered if he might have tried to say something else after she blocked him, but I checked and I don’t think so.

    Alison: An hour of your time before the end of the week. You have two hours to respond.
    Patrick: Sending a car now.
    Patrick: MARY KIM, 126 LAKEVIEW AVE, SUITE 2D, KANSAS CITY, MO.
    *Alison blocks Patrick*

    • Rich McGee

      Anyone actually think that blocking the calls of a telepathic millionaire supervillain executive in charge of a major tech company is meaningful except as a gesture? If he wants to call her, it’s going to happen.

  • Kid Chaos

    Can she really fly now? All she did before was a bit of levitation. Still, nothing ventured, nothing gained.

    • Sabriel

      She seems to be taking this flying thing in stride.

      (Or you know, out of stride, because she’s flying instead of walking.)

    • Perlite

      Last time she said “Time to fly” was when she was testing out her powers (http://sfp.nsch.co/issue-4/page-32/)
      I don’t think she’s exactly flying so much as jumping really high.

      • Ryan

        No, this time she really is flying. Note the curved non-parabolic flight path she taking that let’s us know it’s not just a jump, in contact to previous times.

        • scottfree

          Didn’t she carry the drunk girl who was getting date-raped home by leaping across rooftops?

          • Mystery girl

            Like a favorite big blue hero of mine.
            “SPOOOON!”

          • Ryan

            Yes, she can jump from rooftop to rooftop using controlled jumps, where she can see where she wants to land and aim for it, and not jump so high that she’ll smash the building she’s landing on. A super high, super long jump would be different: she wouldn’t have precise control over where she lands, and whatever she lands on is going to be destroyed.

          • ampg

            She travels from Manhattan to upstate NY in a matter of minutes/hours (it’s unclear) in Issue 4 using controlled jumps, though.

          • Kid Chaos

            I have “Gonna Fly Now” from “Rocky” playing in my head.

  • Sabriel

    Cultural appropriation aside, that mug would be a nice candidate for kintsugi.

    • Pol Subanajouy

      Oh hey, I didn’t even think of that. Though…I don’t know if Patrick would find much beauty out its imperfection and I doubt Allison will see that mug much anymore (Ha! Accidental wordplay!) With any luck maybe he’d learn a lesson.

    • Rich McGee

      I’m impressed by the fact that he had appropriate glue for the repairs right on hand. Not the kind of thing I’d have expected to find in an executive’s office. He’s only had a couple of minutes, and he had to get Mary’s address for Alison before the car got there as well as taking time to stop whatever bleeding’s going on.

      • Balthazar

        Maybe he planned it all?

    • Some guy

      That’s wouldn’t be cultural appropriation.

      • Sabriel

        Perhaps I should have said “potential cultural appropriation.” I added a disclaimer because I don’t know enough about Kintsugi to make that call. I also think it’s really cool, so I can’t exactly trust myself to be objective.

    • I was having the exact same thought, only maybe silver would match the tone better. ooo, or a nice blue cobalt powder.

    • What is kintsugi?

      • Sabriel

        It’s the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with gold or other precious metals. Instead of discarding it as trash, you reclaim it as art and understand that it is more beautiful for having been broken.

        I think that’s really lovely. I love the idea of not giving up on broken things, and I love the fact that instead of hiding the repairs, you are drawing attention to them.

        I don’t know much about the cultural context. I don’t believe that it is culturally gated in any way, but it might be.

  • Insanenoodlyguy

    (Re)Birth of a supervillian?

    • Ryan

      I doubt it. He took the hit as penance. Penance doesn’t really scream super villain.

      • Tsapki

        Really? I thought a painfully spiky suit was just the sort of thing a self-punishing villian would have. The road to Hell etcetera.

        • Benjamin Schwartz

          Marvel did in fact have an antihero/antivillain going by Penance for a while, with a horrifyingly spiky suit. He was a hero who messed up and caused a bunch of civilian casualties, tried to seek penance, and wound up just making things worse. Whoops!

          • Mechwarrior

            Yeah, but he was less “antihero” and more “angsty porcupine.”

      • Insanenoodlyguy

        But Loony Mug has been crippled and may never work again. Allison must pay. THE WORLD MUST PAY.

  • Darkoneko Hellsing

    He didn’t dodge become he felt he desserved it.

    • Ryan

      Yeah, she threw it with the expectation that that he would duck because of course he knew it was coming.

    • fairportfan

      in fact, you can see him getting ready to get hit…

    • Oren Leifer

      Because if someone’s throwing something at you, you deserve to be hit.

      • D. Schwartz

        Watch it with that thought. You’re close to justifying every stoning in the world.

      • Oren Leifer

        I made this statement to draw attention to the fact that this is dangerously close to Alison’s line of thought here. Also, I downvoted my own post on purpose: it’s a strawman statement.

    • deebles

      I’m still going with the theory that he didn’t duck because he was too traumatised by the confrontation they’d already had to be properly paying attention to the present moment; he looked very withdrawn/shamefaced in the panel beforehand. Also, as an emotionally distant individual, he likely isn’t used to such raw confrontation (he seemed to be more of a “behind the scenes” villain during his supervillain phase), which might be even tougher to deal with while having mindreading powers than while lacking them.

  • Ryan

    Almost certainly someone is going to catch this on their camera phone and it’ll end up on the news with a headline line “MEGA GIRL: BACK IN ACTION?”

  • fairportfan

    I bet that stung…

  • Oren Leifer

    I love how this comic always pulls at the heartstrings and make you realize how unfair society and people can me. “Why couldn’t you just duck?” almost sounds to me like “Couldn’t you see you were making me angry? Of course I was going to hit you,” leading to domestic abuse-like phrasing. Not that that it what I think this is, but great job making us think about that.

    • Rich McGee

      Yes, well written.

    • Elaine Lee

      If the strong person was male and “Chatty Patty” was female, you would see it as domestic abuse. Why not here?

      • Oren Leifer

        That’s exactly what I meant. The reason I would say otherwise is that they are not particularly a couple or in any other way in a situation where it would be particularly “domestic”, as opposed to just “being a nasty person”.

        • Markus

          For given values of ‘intimate’ it definitely qualifies as intimate partner violence.

  • Pol Subanajouy

    Okay, so flying is a thing you do now, Allison! Um, alright. Anyway, Al confronting Moonshadow is going to be a bit messy too. Well, at least Patrick is well enough to be doing arts and craft with the broken mug. Bet his face is at smarting something fierce at least.

    I don’t know, this emotional aftermath stuff is always hard for me in real life. This doesn’t even feel like the quiet before or after the storm right now. It feels like just a quiet nadir between two intense dramatic life event storms.

    TLDR: I’m in a glass case of emotions.

  • Korataki

    I truly hope that Alison isn’t flying straight to Mary’s address. She is not in a good place emotionally right now and really should give herself a chance to find some equilibrium before heading into such a dangerous and volatile situation.

    This could so easily snowball into a tragedy. 🙁

  • Rich McGee

    Blood on the back of his hand there.
    Not that I’m sad about that.

  • chaosvii

    Why couldn’t you have made the choice that implied you were still struggling against me? Still capable of fighting?
    We were fighting right?! Trading blows?! You mess with my mind and I punch stuff and it’s not…

    Fml, this isn’t the old days, I can fly now. Fuck this, fuck it all. Fuck!

  • scottfree

    So, her flight power isn’t a surprise to her. She was telling herself to calm down when it first happened, and seems to know what she’s doing now. Did she develop the ability to fly and keep it a secret from everyone?

    It seems like a song emotional reaction caused her to slip and express her flight powers/TK field/whatever happened in Patrick’s office. Do you think she’s told anyone else she can do this yet? Patrick didn’t know, do you think her doctor/handler knows?

    • Rod

      But Patrick doesnt just read minds, he views your memories as if they were laid out in front of him. If Alison had already developed this power, then Patrick surely would have known.

    • I think she’s still on rage-pilot mode. When she is finally calm, she’ll probably think about it and go ‘wtf’. That is, if she survives what she’s about to do.

  • Rod

    The majority belief now seems to be that, if it was deliberate, it was to provoke her enough to bring out her telekinetic power.

    • S.I. Rosenbaum

      I thought the majority belief was now that he was just being a douchebag out of intimacy issues

      • Rod

        Yes, but that’s for those of us (me included) who figure he was just having a “meltdown,” as Alison called it.

        For those still thinking it was deliberate, I now see mostly speculation that he was trying to push her toward her full potential. And if it *was* deliberate, yeah, I’d say that’s as good a reason as any other.

  • Rod

    I find that a bit more plausible now. His invitation to not forget her present, in light of the fact that he would surely know her reaction, seems to be evidence for it.

  • Pat

    That’s Patrick gluing together the Looney-Tunes mug, up in his office.

  • EricJStover

    So wait, I’m going to have to reread this. I’m a feeling lost and confused as to this whole interaction in his building..

    • Mechwarrior

      I think you’re interpreting it correctly.

  • Incard

    The lesson Patrick learned from Looney Tunes was that if you make someone mad enough, they won’t notice when you pull a reverse-psychology trick on them.

    • Ryan

      It’s interesting. This connection would make it incredibly clever if he was playing her this whole time in order to manipulate her somehow. And yet, if he was faking it, why is he now sitting on the floor desperately attempting to glue a shattered mug back together, even after she has left? That detail seems to strongly imply that is breakdown was genuine and not a manipulation of any kind.

      • Incard

        Great point, Ryan. I think I’m in agreement with you: the breakdown was genuine. Patrick’s plan to make Alison angry involved his “I’m a bad guy” philosophical speech. The breakdown is also foreshadowed by the Looney Tunes scene; he is shockingly naive about some things ordinary people take for granted.

      • I think everything up to the whole ‘you can’t read your own mind’ revelation was his planning. When Allison brought that to Patrick’s attention, his whole attitude shifted, and he really started fumbling. That’s why he didn’t duck. He was still reeling.

  • Mechwarrior

    I think the point was that Patrick, for all the know-it-all attitude he likes to project, is still an emotionally fragile teenager who really doesn’t understand himself that well.

    • Elaine Lee

      Best read on this thing, from my POV. In fact, many emotionally fragile teenagers project a know-it-all attitude. Patrick is not alone in this.

    • ∫Clémens×ds

      Okay so, he had no plan? And if he had a plan, did he decide not to go with it in the end?

      • Mechwarrior

        I think that he either didn’t have a plan, or he didn’t realize what the plan would actually mean to him emotionally and therefore ended up being unable to go through with it.

  • Preacher John

    My bet is this conspiracy thing he was on about is the tip of an iceberg which will make all the big bads gone before look like small potatoes, and the whole “be shitty to make Alison go away” thing was Patrick’s plan to get her safely out of his poking into it.

    • KatherineMW

      That just feels poorly thought out as an objective because Patrick is a lot more physically fragile than Allison; he is, by biodynamic standards, ridiculously easy to kill. Sharing information with someone who is much harder to kill would greatly increase the probability that anything he found out didn’t die with him.

      And it doesn’t explain his freakout after Allison took apart his stated personal philosophy. That wasn’t acting.

      • masterofbones

        The only way any part of that exchange *wasnt* acting is if Patrick forgot how to mindread during the conversation. Unfortunately, that seems to have been the case.

  • Mechwarrior

    Elmer season!

  • KatherineMW

    I don’t think so, not entirely. He was genuinely taken aback by her takedown of just how stupid the personal philosophy he’d outlined was, so that was something he genuinely believed, not just something he was saying to rile her up.

  • ampg

    Panel 3 makes me so sad. I know I’m supposed to be happy that Patrick got his comeuppance, but I’m not.

    • chaosvii

      The way I view it is that most stories are designed to evoke happiness for the comeuppance of somebody like Patrick. This one is not only designed to avoid evoking that response, but to go further and challenge the expectation of comeuppance being something to be happy about as a general rule.

  • Sabriel

    To be clear, I wasn’t accusing SFP of cultural appropriation. Patrick is using glue, not metal. He’s not making the repairs decorative.

    • ∫Clémens×ds

      And what even of if he did? You’re mistakenly considering the proper context, this story being on one hand a fairly small webcomic with utterly no means of crushing the Asian culture’s aspirations to cultivate itself, and on the other greatly commented on by smart people who, in the insultingly low probabilities that the author wouldn’t point out that practice and its origins with all the attention it’d deserve herself, would in her place.

      • Sabriel

        And you’re mistakenly assuming that I feel like teaching cultural appropriation 101 right now.

  • KatherineMW

    Moonshadow can’t fly unaided, so she clearly must have had a plane flight this afternoon (in-comic time). And a fast plane too, or else some other means of transport. It’s still the same day that Moonshadow killed Miles and sliced Clevin in New York. Now she’s in Missouri, which must be at least 4-6 hours away.

    • ampg

      No, it’s at least several days later. Alison was at the doctor earlier that day when she got a message from Clevin, who said he was “still” in the hospital due to the extensive damage.

      Also, this could just be her home address, not her current whereabouts.

  • corporate secretaries worth their retainer can generally find that sort of thing on very short notice. And I would think that superglue would be a fairly basic element of your basic corporate supply closet.

  • Eric

    She then proceeded to unfriend him on MySpace.

  • David

    She says [email protected] a lot. haha

    On a more serious note…I’m not sure how I feel about her having such control over her flight despite literally just finding out she could do so.

    On another serious note…this still makes me think it was part of Patrick’s plan. I think he did what he did to purposely bring out a drastic emotional response to get her to “unlock” her untapped potential.

    • chaosvii

      She’s got several state-lines worth of traveling to work out the kinks.
      What makes me uncomfortable about her flight is that she now has the power to resist telekinetic options like what Ignomino was doing (Issue 3 pages 8 & 9). She may no longer be meaningfully neutralized as a threat via a simple act of levitation and hiding behind boot-proof shields, because now she knows that she can propel herself through the air!

  • Sabriel

    Look it up. Educate yourself. And try not to say things like “the Asian culture” because Asia is huge and extremely diverse.

    • Markus

      ‘Educate yourself’ is bar none the laziest copout of an argumentative trump to ever be considered acceptable on the internet, which is saying something. What you’ve essentially said is “You disagree with me, therefore you must be either stupid or uninformed. Read until you agree with me.”

      • dixkens

        No, “educate me” which essentially says “because your time is meaningless to me and I can’t be bothered to look something up” is.

      • Sabriel

        It’s a brush-off.

  • Sabriel

    Oh, yep. I just double-checked and my android also has me speaking from the right.

    I’m used to thinking in terms of color (my texts are white, other people are blue) instead of direction.

  • Lostman

    Here a scary thought; what if Mary not the killer.

    • Sabriel

      Interesting. We saw her talking to the mercs. Why do you doubt it?

      • Lostman

        We saw her as Mary but if they just take the image of Mary?

        • Rod

          Her former teammate’s description of how Mary had to take a darker turn after Mega Girl left suggests that this is a pretty straightforward case of Mary going rogue. If someone IS trying to frame her, they’re doing an excellent job.

        • Sabriel

          That’s possible. Invisibility and glamour have a lot in common, so whatever mechanism causes the slasher’s invisibility could have an upgrade that gives them illusions.

          If that’s true, Alison is about to go put her foot in her mouth. Along with the feet that are already in there. She’s going to be chewing shoes for a while.

          I’d go with Occams Razor on this one, but it’s possible. It would be a good twist. Everybody is growing more powerful, after all.

  • TheGonzoMD .

    Soooo… uh… anyone who wanted Alison to kick the crap out of the big bad villain, this is what you wanted, right?

  • Justin Williams

    Well apparently I won’t have the chance to get the last word, thanks mods!

    • strongfemaleprotagonist

      drop us an email at the address at the bottom of the page if you have questions about comment moderation – I think your comment may have been lost in the system? Pretty sure we didn’t delete it!

  • Rich McGee

    You mean by giving her Mary’s address after refusing earlier? He had no choice in the matter. She’s made it clear that she’s not willing to take no for an answer on this. Probably not on anything else she wants from him, either.
    Quite aside from being physically unstoppable, she can turn him over to the authorities at any time to face punishment for his actions as the Menace. The power balance in their relationship is skewed completely in her favor right now. Unless he can vanish or find a way to coerce her himself Patrick’s wide open to anything she demands of him.

  • Sabriel

    No, he looks Asian American to me too, but I don’t remember his last name.

    I also didn’t mean to accuse that it definitely *was* cultural appropriation.

  • motorfirebox

    Just now realized Alison is repeating the phrase she said the first time she tried to fly. Dr. Rosenblum is gonna have fits.

  • deebles

    A wake up call was already delivered by the verbal thrashing, however. Adding physical injury to that was an abuse of power, whether or not you feel sorry for the person being abused.

  • deebles

    I haven’t really thought about it… but looking back, to me he looks most likely mixed race (e.g. part white, part east Asian).

  • deebles

    “Because he could have ducked, as she expected him to do, as he *knew* she expected him to do, but he *chose* to let it hit him”

    We don’t know that, though, and neither does she, or anyone but Patrick and the writers at this point.

  • Classtoise

    Surely you jest. It was duck season!

  • Rod

    No, she’s all-out flying now. Recall:

    http://sfp.nsch.co/issue-5/page-111/

    That, coupled with the curved arc of her movement lines (as someone else pointed out,) shows she’s actually defying gravity here.

  • Elaine Lee

    Or maybe we’re not supposed to understand… yet. We’re walking (or flying) through the story with Alison. What she doesn’t understand, we may not either. When she figures it out, she’ll let us know.

  • Rod

    I wouldn’t say it’s reprehensible (really, he was jumping up and down on her buttons; “reprehensible” sounds like she ate a baby,) it was highly inappropriate, and is a scene that she’ll regret in the future if she actually has a good moral base.

  • Rod

    She didn’t do it because of his past crimes. She didn’t do it because he’s a cold, calculating person (which she already knew.)

    She did it because he used words on her, and she got angry.

    Don’t you find it suspicious that this scene (which frankly seems a little out of place) occurs in the midst of an entire story arc revolving around issues of female abuse?

    It wouldn’t surprise me in the slightest if somehow her actions here get brought up during her confrontation with Mary (perhaps even as an attempt at justification.)

  • Darkoneko Hellsing

    hah !

  • Lostman

    What I’m saying that a person could have that works like a fae glamour; they use it to turn invisible, why couldn’t they use to take the image of a another person?

  • masterofbones

    And that is my cue to leave. Apparently Patrick is just an idiot that forgot how to read minds for a little while.

  • Markus

    I thought he was South American of mixed Spanish/Native heritage.

  • Johan

    Yes Alison, when you hurt someone, it’s their fault for not dodging.
    That kind of behavior will land you a post on superdickery.com !!
    XD

  • Rich McGee

    What? Unless Mary’s invisibility (already a power upgrade) has evolved into being insubstantial, Mary’s helpless against Alison the moment she gets a solid grip. Might be hard to find and catch, but there’s nothing Mary can do to hurt her directly. Alison can just haul her off to jail, there’s no need to resort to lethal violence. Mary’s not even hard to confine – prison bars don’t need to see you to keep you inside.
    Of course, Alison’s got family. I expect hostage taking will be a thing sooner or later, although Mary doesn’t strike me as a likely candidate for that trope.

  • Kid Chaos

    What about Bugs Bunny? “Ain’t I a stinker?”

  • Orgasms are not a choice.

    Also, can the answer simply be that both of them fucked up and are abusing each other? This particular situation is neither black nor white. I’ll make a short story from a long story. I used to live with someone extremely abusive. As soon as I got too old for physical, the verbal and emotional started. Did I want to hit them? Did I want to knock their teeth down their throat? Yes, absolutely. Would they have deserved it? Yes, without question.

    Would I be right in doing so?

    Not at all.

  • masterofbones

    I can’t use facial structure in comics. There is such variation that I can’t tell what is stylization and what is intended to be a realistic feature.

  • Rod

    Hey, I’m not saying you should feel sorry for him (it’s not as if, for an example, he manipulated any of us by bringing up our deepest childhood abuse and mocking it to our face or something.) Just that Alison should still feel regret for her action, and primarily because of the fact that she DID act out very similarly to a frustrated, abusive boyfriend (with a horrible, button-pushing witch of a girlfriend.)

  • Rod

    “Generally most expect adults to use their words rather than responding to emotional provocation with physical violence.”

    Yes, and rightly so.

    “A superhero with super strength in particular should have the self control to avoid physically assaulting people for being annoying. She should definitely be able to avoid hitting people in the face.”

    One would hope, but honestly, I could totally understand if, at least in the incident with the mug, she threw it and completely forgot about her strength. She *shouldn’t*, of course, but it would be understandable if she did.

    “It is rather reprehensible doing that to someone who isn’t threatening violence against you.”

    Again, that sounds nice and ideal and everything, but it doesn’t quite line up to reality. Most people can, whether they believe it or not, be provoked into violence with words; it’s just human nature. And in some cases a physical response is totally appropriate, regardless of the degree of civility the society has managed to cloak itself with. Pretending otherwise suggests one should expect to be able to do things as unwise as walk around visiting stranger’s funerals and mockingly yell nasty things about the deceased to the face of the grieving spouse, while walking away unscathed because you leave before cops arrive. This is absolutely a situation where a physical response is appropriate and, coupled with a physical ejection from the premises, a fairly reasonable course of action.

    If you disagree and insist that such would be reprehensible, first, I have to wonder what words you rate as indicating even worse behavior (“reprehensible” is pretty high up there in my book, and this scene with Alison and Patrick doesn’t quite qualify.) But after that, well, I just have to hope your perspective is still tempered by an understanding of real-world consequences to harsh, ill-timed words, as the bulk of humanity might not share your total abstinence toward physical responses, regardless of how “reprehensible” that is deemed.

    “She was (and is) a dangerous psychopathic murderer who could on a whim continue her spree,”

    And this seems to be one of the very things the comic is challenging.

    Does your statement apply to every soldier who has ever killed in war? What about to the kings, presidents and governmental assemblies that have sent them? Not that I’m making a claim one way or another, but rather I raise the question to illustrate that, again, the bulk of humanity disagrees, and making such a strong statement effectively condemns those people and all their supporters as well. Once more, not that I am “picking a side,” but if you’re really wanting to make such a statement regarding such affairs just for the sake of a web-comic, then I think I’ll choose to simply shrug and say, “Interesting opinion.”

  • Jubal DiGriz

    I THINK I see what you’re saying, and it’s a good point. What I feel you’ve lost though is that the abuser always has agency (unless there’s an actual medical condition). Bikers aren’t a force of nature, they’re choosing to react in a certain way. Part f the dynamic for rescuing people from abusive situations is finding some way so abuser, abused, or both reclaim their agency.

    Alison (and most every other physical abuser) is still in control of their body. She REALLY ought to be self aware enough by now to at least remove herself from a situation where she might hurt people. That she’s not as others have said makes her human, and highly dangerous.

    Just because Alison has good intentions (and is the SFP) does not excuse her messing up Patrick’s face “’cause he had it coming”. One of the benefits of art is allowing us to discussing these nuances in safety, so kudos to Brennan and Molly for pushing these edges.

  • neyta

    Humans, biologically, have a fight, flight, or freeze response. When you attack people violently sometimes they get so afraid they don’t move. This a predictable response, Alison has almost certainly observed it in people, you shouldn’t predicate whether others get hurt on them responding well to violence.

    Domestic violence affects 25% of relationships. It’s not really a surprise that she’s violent, but it does make me respect her less. A couple minutes of mild trash talk shouldn’t be enough to get her to be violent, from anyone, and she mocked the trash talk anyway, she didn’t think it was that good. People generally aren’t brainwashed into killers in two minutes.

    Increased mental resistance is another possibility.

  • Rod

    *** “Most people can, whether they believe it or not, be provoked into violence with words; it’s just human nature.”

    They can, but not quickly generally, ***

    Ok.

    *** and most people would flee and would shove and such to escape, rather than directing their violent at others. ***

    I think you and I come from very different worlds. Few people I know would flee in the face of words.

    *** This would be very rare. When Fred Phelps protested funerals I don’t know of many incidents where someone attacked them physically. You’re massively exaggerating the extent of people who are violent. ***

    Fred Phelps is a clear case where, should he have pushed much further, it would have warranted some sort of physical response. Fortunately for him, I don’t think he ever got in anyone’s face and yelled at them, or directed his ire specifically at the grieving spouse. True, he might have gotten quite a bit in the settlement, but with the crap HE put out, it would have likely been at the cost of serious injuries. Were he, or anyone, to push it that far, I think the consistency of the consequences might lead you to consider the possibility that *everyone* is violent to some degree, barring a rare handful of truly principled (and extraordinarily lucky) pacifists.

    *** Any attack to someone’s head is potentially fatal, or can lead to brain injuries and insanity. Murder and causing insanity are very high up in my books. ***

    That’s why you call smashing a table and throwing a mug at someone “reprehensible?” What adverb would you use to describe the activity of the thugs at the Waco shootout? What about starvation-driven cannibalism? Or billion-dollar fraud perpetrated on senior citizens?

    *** “Does your statement apply to every soldier who has ever killed in war?”

    She’s using violence to solve her personal problems, my statement doesn’t apply to people under orders to do violence. She’s more dangerous than them. ***

    ….

    No comment.

    (Edited for readibility.)